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mission and vision


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mission and vision


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First Telling Queer History gathering in June 2013

Mission:

The mission of TQH is to create spaces, to connect community across generations, to have authentic conversations, share life experiences, share resources, and build skills in order to shift the narratives under which we live.   

Vision:  

Empowering an intersectional community dedicated to authentic conversation to strengthen a sense of belonging, hope, and possibility to create the world in which we want to live.

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who


Telling Queer History

Connects people who may have have only one thing in common: being lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ). When we share our histories, we often find unexpected commonalities. This gives people a space to grow in their understanding of themselves, each other, and their collective history and foster community.

Free, All-Ages, Sober Events
Held every other month on the second Sunday.
Locations, topics, and storytellers change each gathering.
Visit our blog for upcoming events.

who


Telling Queer History

Connects people who may have have only one thing in common: being lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ). When we share our histories, we often find unexpected commonalities. This gives people a space to grow in their understanding of themselves, each other, and their collective history and foster community.

Free, All-Ages, Sober Events
Held every other month on the second Sunday.
Locations, topics, and storytellers change each gathering.
Visit our blog for upcoming events.

Why

LGBTQ people continue to face transphobia, racism, poverty and violence, even in their own communities and relationships. Telling Queer History shows attendees that we have shared struggles and goals. Through sharing stories, our events unite us as a rooted and connected community.

Queer people often feel isolated because so much of our history is buried by systemic violence. Through our events, Telling Queer History works to eliminate isolation so attendees feel empowered to lead in a community they feel connection to. Bearing witness to our current, personal stories and how they relate to past histories gives us a crucial sense of place, pride, belonging, and empathy which allows us to better work together. 

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history


We quickly saw how stories can be a powerful medium to bring people together. Even at our first event, we connected 16 to 70 year olds around race, gender, sexuality and class.

history


We quickly saw how stories can be a powerful medium to bring people together. Even at our first event, we connected 16 to 70 year olds around race, gender, sexuality and class.

History

Our first gathering was June 2013 at Madame of the Arts, a radical queer event space. It was attended by about 25 people, much to our surprise and excitement. The people attending ranged from ages 16-70 and held a large range of identities across race, gender, sexuality and class.

From Founder Rebecca Lawrence “During the Equality and Justice Summit in December of 2012, I heard my uncle Dan Hawkins share about his experience losing so many of his peers during the 1980s AIDS crisis. I realized how much history was lost with those lives and how much was shaped by that loss. I brought the idea of sharing stories to other activist friends and they all encouraged me to create the gatherings.

in 2013, I met Scott Artley at a Quorum meeting, told him my idea and he was enthusiastic about it. Scott helped shape Telling queer history in many ways. From there, many many people and places have made this series of gatherings possible. 

Before TQH was created, I was doing my own research on Queer history through books, movies and interviewing elders. After capturing unique images inside the staff room at the moment of victory at the Minnesotans United For All Families, I was invited to archive my images at the Tretter Collection. Lisa Vecoli, curator of the Tretter collection, gave Jie Wronski-Riley (a past facilitator of TQH) and I a tour in January 2013. It cemented the need to learn and share more of our history with a wider community."


To read about and listen to past events, visit our stories page. 


Co-hosts and collaborators:

Hennepin County Library
Tretter Collection at the University of Minnesota
Quatrefoil Library
Mid-Continent Oceanographic Institute
Reclaim! 
Madame of the Arts
Clare Housing
Central Area Neighborhood Development Organization (CANDO)
Hennepin History Museum
SpringHouse Ministry

Telling Queer history contributors
Rebecca Jean Lawrence • SCOTT ARTLEY • HANNAH QUINN RIVENBURG • JEREMEY KELLER • HarRY WATERS JR. • JIE WRONSKI-RILEY • ARVID NELSEN • PATRICIA VANERT • PATRICK WEBER • EMILY GUS • MADELINE LESLIE • CLAIRE AVITABiLE • OLIVIA LEVINS HOLDEN • EMMA RIESE • ANGELA CALLAIS •Rebecca Aylesworth • Patricia VanErt • BETH ELLSWORTH • Emily Butler •Meghan lafferty • Alaina Desalvo • AND MANY OTHERS.

Thank you!